37th Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval Studies: Part 1

This past 25 March, the Center held its 37th Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval Studies. This year’s conference, “The Generative Power of Tradition: A Celebration of Traditio, 75 Years,” explored both the power of tradition in producing new ideas and movements and the role and history of Traditio in the humanities.

This year’s conference was divided into two panel sessions and two roundtables, with Father Joseph T. Lienhard, S.J., beginning the conference with a brief history of Traditio’s origin, its current role in facilitating discourse in numerous disciplines in the humanities, and its future under both Fordham and Cambridge University Press. [Read on for our full coverage of the 37th Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval Studies] Continue reading

Summer Conference on Europe After Wyclif

vaclav_brozik_-_husIn conjunction with the website, The Latin Works of John Wyclif, Fordham will be hosting a conference this coming June entitled “Europe After Wyclif”. Fordham is sponsoring the conference jointly with Michael Van Dussen at McGill University, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the Lollard Society. It is co-chaired by Fordham Theology Professor J. Patrick Hornbeck II, and will take place at the Lincoln Center Campus, June 4-6, 2014.

“Europe after Wyclif” aims to explore the impact of John Wyclif, a controversial Oxford scholar, and the L/lollards in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, particularly in continental contexts. By taking an interdisciplinary approach to the theme, the conference organizers highlight intersections between Wycliffism, traditionally considered a purely insular heresy of the fourteenth century, and broader European cultural trends. Most of the presentations will address Wycliffism or oppositions to it in England and abroad, but some will focus on related contemporary religious movements, such as the Hussites and Waldensians. Scholars of late-medieval religion, literature, and politics will find this conference exciting as it links geographic and cultural areas that are most often treated separately. The full program is listed on the conference website, along with instructions on how to register.

The Latin Works of John Wyclif, a digital initiative first undertaken by Dr. Hornbeck and Georgetown Professor Penn Szittya, includes Latin Wyclif image letters, sermons, and other works within the Wyclif corpus. The site’s continuing aim is to digitize the full canon of Wyclif’s works, first published in nineteenth- and twentieth-century editions.

Welcome to the Venerable Blog! (And News of the French of Outremer Conference)

Welcome to The Venerable Blog, a biweekly update highlighting the wide range of digital activities taking place on the sites hosted by Fordham’s Center for Medieval Studies. We invite you to comment and participate as our digital projects change and expand!

french of outremer thumbnail (1)This week, we’d like to bring attention to our annual conference taking place March 29-30 at Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus. This year’s topic, “The French of Outremer: Communities and Communication in the Crusading Mediterranean,” grows out of the French of Outremer website hosted by the Center. The French of Outremer (or FOO) conference will feature roughly 50 speakers coming from Lebanon, Cyprus, Italy, France, Denmark, the UK, Canada, and the US who will offer papers exploring the artistic, geographical, historical, linguistic, literary, musical, and religious aspects of the French penetration and colonization of lands in the eastern Mediterranean.  Two of the three plenary sessions will showcase well-known French of Outremer scholars Peter Edbury (Cardiff University) and Laura Minervini (University of Naples), and the third will feature a sneak peek from two Metropolitan Museum of Art curators who are planning the MET’s 2016 exhibition, “Jerusalem, 1000-1400.” An updated version of the program, including speaker names along with their paper abstracts, can be found here.  If you are unable to join us in person, be sure to follow the conference on twitter, at #FOO2014. We will be live-streaming Dr. Edbury’s presentation, so check the conference web-page for instructions on how to follow the presentation and tweet in comments or questions.

We are looking forward to the conference with great excitement, and view it as a real opportunity to expand the activities and reach of the site. The French of Outremer site currently serves as a scholarly meeting place for those interested in French-language texts and communities from the Latin East.

Tombstone of Gauthier Mainebeuf  — Image courtesy of Pierre-Vincent Claverie

We are continuously updating the various source pages and adding new scholarly submissions to our “thematic essay” page.  An exciting recent contribution by French scholar Pierre-Vincent Claverie provides an introduction to the topic of Frankish epigraphy, and includes detailed images of both Latin- and  French-language inscriptions etched on tombstones and other stone surfaces from the Latin East. We will soon be posting two more essays, one on textual translation in the Latin East, and another on wills from the Levant.

 

 Our next blog post will highlight the latest additions to the French of England website, for those wishing to perfect their Anglo-Norman accents!